Schedule

Click here to download the conference schedule.

Sponsors: National Science Foundation Award #1933178, the IUCRC BRAIN Center, the Katherine G. McGovern College of the Arts at the University of Houston, and the International Graphonomics Society.

 

Sunday, June 9, 2019

SIGN-IN
6:00 – 7:00 p.m.

Sign-in and get your welcome package at the Conference Hospitality Desk, located in the hotel lobby

WELCOME DINNER
7:00 – 11:00 p.m.

Enjoy a Maya Buffet, Azur Pool
WELCOME
8:00 p.m.
Azur Pool
Conference Chair:
Jose Luis Contreras-Vidal, Director of the University of Houston NSF IUCRC BRAIN Center, and
International Graphonomics Society President (IGS): Claudio De Stefano, University of Cassino and Southern Latium

 

Monday, June 10, 2019
Conference Center Room Aqua 2
Neuroaesthetics, Creativity & the Neuroscience of Graphonomic Skills
9:00 – 9:10 a.m.

Introduction to IGS2019: Your Brain on Art, Creativity and Innovation, the BRAIN Roadmap, and the NSF Doctoral Consortium
Jose L. Contreras-Vidal, University of Houston, USA
Director, University of Houston IUCRC BRAIN
IGS2019 Chair

9:10 – 9:40 a.m.

PLENARY TALK: Embodied Writing in Material Contexts: Towards Uncovering Neural Representations and Creativity

Cristina Rivera-Garza
Distinguished Professor, Hispanic Studies + Creative Writing
Director of PhD Creative Writing in Spanish
University of Houston and
Division of Literatures, Cultures, and Languages
Stanford University

Abstract: Writing is not an ethereal and mysterious activity better left unexplored, but a practice that engages both body and material surroundings. Based on collaborative and interdisciplinary work with the NSF BRAIN Center at the University of Houston, we have closely followed the creative process of a group of bilingual students enrolled in an undergraduate creative writing workshop that asked them to develop writing exercises while physically engaging with a predominantly Mexican neighborhood surrounding the main campus. We measured brain activity as students prepared for and developed writing exercises, and as they participated both in walking tours and in writing workshops. As this data allowed us to measure change over the course of the semester, it became clear that heightening awareness of the embodied nature of the creative and writing process resulted in writing practices that transcended established notions of genre, generating cross-genre pieces of sound aesthetic value. It also invited a greater cross- and interdisciplinary exploration of text and image, and a more conscious and innovative use of the page space. Data gathered in this format has allowed us to compare and contrast the brain activity of creative writers as they wrote in Spanish and/or in English—an emerging area in the ample field of neuroscience. Furthermore, because students were able to see and interrogate how their own brains behaved while writing, they connected practices usually perceived as unrelated such as science and creative writing.

Chair: Jose 'Pepe' Contreras-Vidal, University of Houston, USA

9:40 – 10:40 a.m.

Panel: How the creative arts and aesthetic experiences engage the human mind and promote creativity and innovation?
Chair: Dario Robleto, Conceptual Artist and Artist-at-Large at Northwestern University's McCormick School of Engineering, USA

This panel (15 min/speaker) is dedicated to summarizing the state-of-the-art, and/or identifying challenges in research on neuroaesthetics and creativity.

  • The Integration of the Humanities and Arts with Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine in Higher Education (Discussion of Branches from the Same Tree (2018) report)
    J.D. Talasek
    Director of Cultural Programs of the National Academy of Sciences (CPNAS), Washington, D.C., USA
  • Characterizing the stages of creative writing from frontal and temporal mobile EEG data using Partial Directed Coherence
    Jesus Gabriel Cruz-Garza, Akshay Sujatha Ravindran, Cristina Rivera Garza and Jose Luis Contreras-Vidal
    University of Houston, USA
  • How and What a Motivated-reinforcement-learning Theory of Aesthetic Values Learns
    Norberto Grzywacz and Hassan Aleem
    Georgetown University, USA
  • Body is Other: Mediations and Translations in Creative Writing and Neuroaesthetics
    Maria Jose Delgadillo, Jesús Cruz Garza and Cristina Rivera Garza
    University of Houston, USA
10:40 – 11:00 a.m. Open Forum and Discussion
Scribes will document the session and report back to the audience at the conclusion of the conference
ART & SCIENCE CAFÉ
Aqua Room 1A-C
11:00 – 11:30 a.m.

Mobile Brain-Body Imaging (MoBI) Technology Demonstrations
Exhibitors will showcase the latest MoBI technologies to record and analyze the brain in action.

11:30 – 12:30 p.m.

SPECIAL SESSION:
Noninvasive Brain-Machine-Interfaces: From Basic to Clinical Applications

Chairs: Surjo Soekadar, University Hospital of Tubigen, Germany and Jose Azorin, Universidad Miguel del Elche, Spain

This panel (15 min/speaker) will review emergent neurotechnologies for restoration and rehabilitation of graphonomic motor function after brain injury or neurological disease.

  • State of the Art in noninvasive brain-machine interface for fine motor control
    Jose L Contreras-Vidal
    University of Houston, USA
  • Feasibility and safety of EEG/EOG-based bilateral exoskeleton control to restore hand motor function
    Marius Nann, Niels Peekhaus and Surjo Soekadar
    University Medical Center, Germany
  • Preliminary Assessment of hands motor imagery in theta- and beta-bands for Brain-Machine-Interfaces using functional connectivity analysis
    Jorge Gaxiola, Mario Ortiz, Eduardo Iañez, D. Gutiérrez and José M. Azorín
    Universidad Miguel Hernandez del Elche, Spain
  • Current and future applications of brain-computer interfaces
    Alex Lechner
    Gtec, Austria
12:30 – 1:00 p.m. Open Forum and Discussion
Scribes will document the session and report back to the audience at the conclusion of the conference
ART&SCIENCE COMIDA
1:00 – 2:30 p.m.

Lunch with your newly found research partners at Live Aqua

IUCRC BRAIN Roadmap focus groups working lunch (by-invitation)

2:30 – 3:30 p.m.

The neuroscience of artistic and contemplative arts (drawing, music, painting, creative handwriting).
Chair: Jose L Contreras-Vidal, University of Houston, USA

This panel (15 min/speaker) will discuss the neuroscience and neuroimaging of artistic and contemplative arts fine motor skills in the creative arts.

  • Preliminary Kinematic and Kinetic Analysis of Controlled Variables in Violinist Performance
    Justin Tanner, Robert Culibrk and Stephen Helms Tillery
    Arizona State University, USA
  • Frequency Analysis of EEG Activity during Artistic Creative Tasks
    Mario Ortiz, Eduardo Iáñez, Jorge Gaxiola and José María Azorín
    Universidad Miguel Hernandez del Elche, Spain
  • The relationships between music and empathic decision making in healthy young adults
    Aaron Colverson
    University of Florida, USA
  • Screens vs. Galleries: A Neural Study on the Importance of Museums
    Jesús Tamez-Duque, Fernanda Zapata-Murrieta, Rodrigo Peimbert, Memo Santos, Jose Luis Contreras-Vidal and Rogelio Soto.
    Tecnologico de Monterrey, Mexico
3:30 – 4:00 p.m. Open Forum and Discussion
Scribes will document the session and report back to the audience at the conclusion of the conference
ARTFUL SCIENCE PERFORMANCES

4:00-5:00pm

Art-Sci Performance Demonstrations:

Your Brain in Improvised Action (15 min)

In this demonstration, the brain waves of a visual artist, a sax player and a dancer will be projected in real-time as the artists creatively improvise in close interaction with each other. With the participation of:

  • Teresa Chapman: Performer and professor of dance technique, aesthetics, and pedagogy.
  • Dario Robleto, Conceptual visual artist
  • Woody Witt: Saxophonist, composer and educator
  • Jose Contreras-Vidal, Jesus Cruz-Garza: Neuroengineers

The Brain, Painting, and the Nahual (15 min)

The Maya believe the human spirit lives in two parts, one that inhabits the body and a second mirror spirit, the Nahual, that wanders outside, walking alongside us as protector, companion, dream. In this work, we will create a digital Nahual from the bio-feedback of brain waves of artist Geraldina Wise as she paints in real-time. Using mobile brain-body imaging technology and signal analysis algorithms, Eric Todd will generate an animated composition that parallels her corporeal design. For each mark she makes on the canvas, a corresponding "mark" will be generated on a digital canvas, the shape and color of which determined by a snapshot of Geraldina's brain waves at the moment of mark-making. The effect will be a graphonomic digital sketch of the artist’s mind as she creates.

  • Geraldina Wise, Houston-based artist with Eric Todd, artist-neuroengineer

Forensic Poetry: El 27th /The 27th de Eugenio Tisselli (15 min)

  • Saul Hernandez-Vargas, Visual Artist and Writer

 

Tuesday, June 11, 2019
Conference Center Room Aqua 2
BioMedical Applications
9:00 – 9:30 a.m.

PLENARY TALK: Beware My Foolish Heart: Insights and Problems in the Computational Modeling of Emotions

Giuseppe Boccignone
Dipartimento di Informatica
Università degli Studi di Milano, Italy

Abstract: This talk will provide a critical overview of current approaches to affective computing. After mini-survey on current psychological — neurobiological theories of emotions, current end-to-end approaches will be compared against simulation-based approaches. The simulation-based perspective is surmised to provide a suitable basis for grounding probabilistic, Bayesian generative models of affect. Insights, limitations, cumbersome sides of this proposal are also discussed.

Chair: Claudio de Stefano, Università degli Studi di Cassino e del Lazio Meridionale, Italy.

9:30 – 10:30 a.m.

How creativity, neuroscience and technology improve health and advance education?
Chair: Claudio de Stefano, Università degli Studi di Cassino e del Lazio Meridionale, Italy.

This panel (12 min/speaker) will assess the state of the art and challenges in understanding the healing power of the creative arts.

  • Into the Wild: The Neuroscience of Art Therapy and Creative Expression
    Juliet King
    Georgetown University, USA
  • Museum-based visual art programs for people with dementia: A systematic review
    Priscila Cunha, Monica Stout, Leila Ledbetter, Dario Robleto, Jessica Ruhle, Heather Whitson and Laura Previll
    Duke University, USA
  • Handwriting Analysis for the Diagnosis of Alzheimer Disease: A Preliminary Study
    Nicole Dalia Cilia, Claudio De Stefano and Francesco Fontanella
    Università degli Studi di Cassino e del Lazio Meridionale, Italy
  • Deep Transfer Learning for Alzheimer's disease detection
    Nicole Dalia Cilia, Claudio De Stefano, Francesco Fontanella, Claudio Marrocco and Mario Molinara.
    Università degli Studi di Cassino e del Lazio Meridionale, Italy
  • Exploring Affective Responsive Engagement by Augmenting Multiple Human Sensations
    Yanjun Lyu
    Arizona State University, USA
10:30 – 11:00 a.m.

Open Forum and Discussion
Scribes will document the session and report back to the audience at the conclusion of the conference

ART & SCIENCE CAFÉ
Aqua Room 1A-C
11:00 – 11:30 a.m.

MoBI Technology Demonstrations

Exhibitors will showcase the latest MoBI technologies to record and analyze the brain in action.

11:30 – 12:00 p.m.

Roadmap for Wearable Neurotechnology and Society
Chairs/Moderators: Pepe Contreras-Vidal and George Zouridakis

This panel (4 min/panelist) will lead an 'unconference-style' discussion on the role(s) and impact of wearable neurotechnology on the arts, humanities, science, engineering, medicine, and society in general.

Panelists:

  • J.D. Talasek, National Academy of Science, USA
  • David Mayerich, University of Houston, USA
  • Dario Robleto, Artist-at-Large at Northwestern University's McCormick School of Engineering
  • Dave Thompson, Kansas State University, USA
  • Jose Azorin, Universidad Miguel Hernandez del Elche, Spain
  • Jessica Ruhle, Nasher Museum of Art, Duke University, USA
  • Jorge Lozoya, Tecnologico de Monterrey, Mexico
12:00 – 1:00 p.m.

Open Forum and Discussion
Scribes will document the session and report back to the audience at the conclusion of the conference

ART&SCIENCE COMIDA
1:00 – 2:30 p.m.

Lunch with your newly found research partners at Live Aqua

IUCRC BRAIN Roadmap focus groups working lunch (by-invitation)

2:30 – 3:30 p.m.

Novel approaches to the diagnosis of neurological disorders and other medical applications of graphonomics
Chair: Claudio De Stefano, Università di Cassino e del Lazio Meridionale, Italy

This panel (12 min/speaker) will discuss novel approaches to analysis of handwriting, drawing, music playing and other fine motor skills.

  • Explainable AI for automatic diagnosis of Parkinson’ disease by handwriting analysis: experiments and findings
    Antonio Della Cioppa, Rosa Senatore, Angelo Marcelli, Giovanni Palladino and Antonio Parziale.
    University of Salerno, Italy
  • An overview on handwriting protocols and features for the diagnosis of Alzheimer Disease
    Nicole Dalia Cilia, Claudio De Stefano and Francesco Fontanella.
    University of Salerno, Italy
  • My Dementia Choir: An ‘in-the-moment’ assessment of physiological responses and subjective wellbeing in a 12-week participatory choral program for people with a dementia
    Emilie Brotherhood, Emma Harding, Nicholas Firth, Esther Jones, Paul Camic and Sebastian Crutch
    Dementia Research Centre, UCL Institute of Neurology, UK
  • Ageing reduces performance asymmetry between the hands in force production and manual dexterity
    Qun Fang, Chris Aiken, Arend Van Gemmert, Jian Xu and Zhujun Pan.
    Louisiana State University, USA
  • The effect of heat stress on the performance of a graphomotor choice-reaction time task
    Kevin Becker, Chris Aiken, Cheng-Ju Hung and Arend Van Gemmert
    Louisiana State University, USA
3:30 - 4:00 p.m.

Open Forum and Discussion
Scribes will document the session and report back to the audience at the conclusion of the conference

ART & SCIENCE CAFÉ
Aqua Room 1A-C
4:00 – 4:30pm
ART-SCI PERFORMANCES
4:00 – 5:00 p.m.

Brain-Computer Interface Project Presentations
Moderators: Jose Azorin (Universidad Miguel Hernandez del Elche, Spain) and Alex Lechner (Gtec, Austria)

Doctoral Consortium Trainees

5:00 – 8:00 p.m. Networking with newly found colleagues @ Live Aqua
8:00 – 11:00 p.m. Banquet at the Garden of the Senses

 

Wednesday, June 12, 2019
Conference Center Room Aqua 2
Doctoral Consortium: Convergent Research and Education
9:00 – 9:30 a.m.

PLENARY TALK: Your brain in motion: challenges and opportunities for data-driven implicit interaction

Luis A. Leiva
Department of Communications and Networking
Aalto University, Finland

Abstract: When interacting with computers, the intention of the user is mostly hidden. The activation of automatic goals and the physical traits of stimuli in our environment all influence our thoughts and behavior considerably, and often without our awareness. In addition, to learn a user's interests reliably, intelligent systems need a significant amount of training data from the user. However, the cost of obtaining such training data is often prohibitive because users must directly label each training instance. Meanwhile, users expect a computerized system to work reasonably well as soon as they first use the system. In this talk I will show that there is a lot of information inherently encoded in user interactions, which can be measured and from which it is possible to extract meaningful knowledge. An implicit interaction is an action a user performs with little (or no) awareness but which a computerized system can understand as input. By leveraging these implicit interactions, it possible to create more useful applications and services.

9:30 – 10:30 a.m. Convergent Research and Education
Chair: JD Talasek, National Academy of Science, and Jose L Contreras-Vidal, University of Houston

This panel (10 min/speaker; 5 min/trainee) will address challenges in trans-disciplinary research and education.

  • Progressive Partnerships: Neuroaesthetics, Art Therapy and Museum Education
    Juliet King, Georgetown University
    Jessica Ruhle, Duke University
  • Towards Automated Reading of Historical Vietnamese Steles
    Anna Scius-Bertrand, Jérémie Bosom, Philippe Papin and Marc Bui
    Ecole Pratique des Hautes Etudes-Paris, France
  • Trainee perspectives on research and education at the nexus of art, science and medicine
    Steven Shepard, University of California-Berkeley, USA
    Mary Ellen Ruff, Capella University, USA
    Adam Lopez, University of Missouri at Kansas City, USA
    Hassan Aleem, Georgetown University, USA
    Stephanie Scott, Colorado State University, USA
    Jesus Cruz-Garza, University of Houston, USA
    Melissa Noble, University of Houston, USA
10:30 – 11:00 a.m.

Open Forum and Discussion
Scribes will document the session and report back to the audience at the conclusion of the conference

ART & SCIENCE CAFÉ
Aqua Room 1A-C
11:00 – 11:30 a.m.

MoBI Technology Demonstrations

Exhibitors will showcase the latest MoBI technologies to record and analyze the brain in action.

11:30 – 12:40 p.m.

Biometric and Forensic Applications
Chair: Rejean Plamondon, École Polytechnique de Montréal, Canada

This panel (10 min/speaker) will discuss novel approaches to identifying and quantifying behavioral individuality with applications to subject identification, signature verification, and forensic handwriting examination.

  • Synthetic Generation of Online Signatures using a Deep Generative Model
    Paul Maergner, Taha Sükrü Karabacakoglu, Kaspar Riesen, Rolf Ingold and Andreas Fischer
    University of Applied Sciences and Arts Western Switzerland
  • Forensic examination of dynamic signatures: Multivariate signature data and evidence evaluation
    Jacques Linden, Silvia Bozza, Raymond Marquis and Franco Taroni
    Ecole des Sciences Criminelles, Switzerland
  • Biometric Signature: Analysis in forensic field of forged tracing over the original
    Massimo Baraldi, Silvia Benini and Tatiana Zucco
    Centro Ricerche Sulla Scrittura, Italy
  • Adaptive learning rates schedules: performance evaluation
    Gianmarco Ragognetti, Antonio Parziale, Rosa Senatore and Angelo Marcelli
    University of Salerno, Italy
  • Electronic handwritten signatures’ software: framework for benchmarking of “forensic tools”
    Nicolò Di Toma, Mirka Mantoan and Milena Pugnaloni.
    Centro Ricerche Sulla Scrittura, Italy
  • Forensic Question: Pressure Alterations in Writing Induced by Sound Conditioning (Acoustic Stress)
    Elena Brunelli, Maria Pia Prati and Marilù Principe
    Centro Ricerche sulla Scrittura, Italy
  • Biometric handwriting and forensic questions. The consanguinity in the expertise
    Milena Pugnaloni, Anna Baraldi, Giampiero Tovani, Rosa Aliperti and Mariagiovanna Russo.
    Centro Ricerche sulla Scrittura, Italy

12:40-1:00 p.m.

Open Forum and Discussion
Scribes will document the session and report back to the audience at the conclusion of the conference

ART&SCIENCE COMIDA
1:00 – 2:30 p.m.

Lunch with your newly found research partners at Live Aqua

IUCRC BRAIN Roadmap focus groups working lunch (by-invitation)

2:30 – 3:50 p.m.
Aqua room 2

Special Workshop: Lognormality Principle and its Applications in Graphonomics

This panel (15 min/speaker, including Q&A) will discuss the Kinematic Theory and its lognormal models to investigate various applications like handwriting recognition, signature verification, data augmentation, human computer interface, handwriting learning, developmental and biomedical issues and devices and artistic applications, etc.

Chairs: Miguel Ángel Ferrer Ballester, Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria and Réjean Plamondon, École Polytechnique de Montréal, Canada

  • Lognormality of Velocity Profiles in Rapid Robotic Arm Movements
    Moises Diaz, Jose J. Quintana, Miguel Ferrer, Cristina Carmona-Duarte, Adam Wolniakowski and Kanstantsin Miatliuk.
    Universidad del Atlantico Medio, Spain
  • Looking at the principle of motor equivalence through the “lognormal-glasses”
    Antonio Parziale, Rosa Senatore and Angelo Marcelli.
    University of Salerno, Italy
  • Graphomotor Evolution in the Handwriting of Bengali Children Through Sigma-Lognormal Based-Parameters: A Preliminary Study
    Moises Diaz, Miguel Ferrer, Richard Guest and Umapada Pal.
    Universidad del Atlantico Medio, Spain
  • Pre-screening for Central or Peripheral Shoulder Fatigue using the Sigma-lognormal Model
    Anaïs Laurent, Réjean Plamondon and Mickaël Begon
    Polytechnique Montréal, Canada
  • Combining Interval Arithmetic with the Branch and Bound Algorithm for Delta-lognormal Parameter Extraction
    Simon Pierre Boyogueno Bidias, Jean Pierre David, Yvon Savaria and Réjean Plamondon
    Polytechnique Montréal, Canada
MoBI Workshop
2:30 – 3:30 p.m.
Aqua Room 1A

Mobile Brain-Body Imaging (MoBI) Technology Workshop
Music for Solo Performer—Revived!
At Brandeis University on April 5, 1965, Alvin Lucier demonstrated world’s first Brain Machine Interface. Having learned of Edmond Dewan’s brain signal monitoring research Lucier borrowed a set of electrodes, ran the output through a series of high-powered audio amplifiers, band-passed the signal between 9 and 15Hz and routed the signal to a roomful of transducers that were sitting on top of various musical instruments. Thereby, the performer’s alpha activity was used to ‘play’ the instruments.
Lucier’s use of EEG as a control signal is very simple, but musically effective. MFSP has gone down in the history of music as more than just ‘the brain piece’. Lucier was aided in this effort by non-other than John Cage himself. Cage (who by then was the America’s premier experimental composer) was delighted by Lucier’s idea to make music out of brain waves and greatly encouraged the younger composer to realize his work. Cage served as the performer’s assistant (one of the many meaningful contradictions inherent in the piece is that it is not really for a solo performer). While Lucier sat on stage generating alpha activity Cage controlled the mix by routing the EEG to different instruments about the room. Although it was his first stab at experimental composition, this piece is emblematic of Lucier’s mature aesthetic: it is more about listening than music making. It is about revealing the inner beauty of sound itself with simple processes.
Realizing such a piece, however, is not such a simple process. In this MoBI workshop, we will show how to develop a modern (technologically speaking) adaptation of MFSP. Using Brain Products LiveAmp, RNet, and opensource software, we will perform this piece, truly as a performance by a solo performer. Using Leap Motion as a motion capture and LabStreamingLayer (LSL) to unify the signals, the performer will be able to shape a soundscape using his hands and mind in real-time. The sounds themselves will be digitally generated using Pure Data.
Workshop led by David Medine, Product Manager of Brain Computer Interfaces, Brain Products, Germany

ART & SCIENCE CAFÉ
Aqua Room 1A
3:30 – 3:40 p.m.
3:40 – 4:00 p.m.

Award Ceremony

AJWR Thomassen Best paper Student Award

BR41N.IO Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) Hackathon (https://www.br41n.io/Cancun-2019)
The Artistic Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) Hackathon is organized with support by g.tec and the IEEE BRAIN Initiative.
BCI hackathon Leaders: Alex Lechner, g.tec, Austria and Jose Azorin, Universidad Miguel Hernandez del Elche, Spain

4:00 – 5:00 p.m.
Conference Center Room Aqua 2

IGS Outlook/BRAIN Roadmap
Moderators: Jose L. Contreras-Vidal, University of Houston
Teams of NSF-supported doctoral Trainees will report back to the audience the findings of the Conference on GRAPHONOMICS AND YOUR BRAIN ON ART, CREATIVITY AND INNOVATION and the BRAIN Roadmap

5:00 p.m.

End of Conference/Doctoral Consortium

 

SPECIAL WORKSHOP 2 (Hands-on)

Mobile Brain-Body Imaging (MoBI)

2:00 – 3:30 p.m.
Aqua Room 1A

In this hands-on training workshop, participants will be introduced to real-time, multimodal, portable data acquisition and analysis using wearable wireless EEG devices and other sensors.

ART & SCIENCE CAFÉ
Aqua Room 1C
3:30 – 4:00 p.m.

 

 

SPECIAL WORKSHOP 3 (Hands-on)

Artistic Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) Hackathon organized by g.tec
The BCI Hackathon is open to all students and faculty that would like to team-up for designing and learning how to create an artistic BCI. All hackathon activities will not overlap with the main conference track and other workshops and thus you can participate on all! Details on the BCI Hackathon can be found here. Note that the award ceremony with presentations will occur on:

4:00 – 5:00 p.m.
Aqua Room 1A

BR41N.IO Artistic Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) Hackathon (Register at https://www.br41n.io/Cancun-2019)

 

Thursday, June 13, 2019
Cultural activities (optional, additional fee):

Tulum Archeological Beach Site
Tulum is located 78 miles South of Cancun, about a 1:45 hour driving trip. It was discovered by John L. Stephens in 1842. Perched on top of a cliff facing the Caribbean Sea, it is the only entirely walled-in group of Mayan ruins ever discovered. Under the advice of an official English speaking tour guide, the group will go around the structures getting the history and spirit of the Mayan.

In this tour you will be guided through one of the most impressive and well-preserved Mayan ruins of the Yucatan Peninsula. Certified guides will share their knowledge about the Mayan Civilization and the Tulum ruins. After the guided tour you will have free time to explore the archaeological zone on your own, take pictures or take a dip at the beach in the crystal clear waters of the Caribbean Sea. Finish your day enjoying a variety of international flavors and drinks of your choice surrounded by the exotic scenery in an exclusive Beach Club. Pick up at Live Aqua 7:30 AM

 

Men's Shorts - Shop Men's Shorts Online